Read Harder 2017: Read a Book About Sports

At the end of December, I wrote about Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge for 2017 and why it was an awesome way to expand your reading choices and try something new.  Now that the new year is here, I’ll be posting suggested reading lists every week for anyone interested in completing the challenge.  Click here to see the challenge in its entirety.  Just remember – these lists are only here as a suggestion, and you are free to read any qualified book for any of the challenges.

First challenge: Read a book about sports.

Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream by H.G. Bissinger
796.3309 BISSINGE

“Socially and racially divided, Odessa isn’t known to be a place big on dreams, but every Friday night from September to December, when the Panthers play football, dreams can come true. With frankness and compassion, H. G. Bissinger unforgettably captures a season in the life of Odessa and shows how single-minded devotion to the team shapes the community and inspires-and sometimes shatters-the teenagers who wear the Panthers’ uniforms.” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

 


Concussion by Jeanne Marie Laskas
617.1027 LASKAS

Concussion is the riveting, unlikely story of Dr. Bennet Omalu, the pathologist who made one of the most significant medical discoveries of the twenty-first century, a discovery that challenges the existence of America’s favorite sport and puts him in the crosshairs of football’s most powerful corporation: the NFL.” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

 

 


Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by Michael Lewis
796.357 LEWIS

Moneyball is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. Following the low-budget Oakland Athletics, their larger-than-life general manger, Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts, Michael Lewis has written not only “the single most influential baseball book ever” (Rob Neyer, Slate) but also what “may be the best book ever written on business” (Weekly Standard). In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis shows us how and why the new baseball knowledge works. He also sets up a sly and hilarious morality tale: Big Money, like Goliath, is always supposed to win… how can we not cheer for David?” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 


Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall
796.424 MCDOUGAL

“McDougall reveals the secrets of the world’s greatest distance runners–the Tarahumara Indians of Copper Canyon, Mexico–and how he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a fifty-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of super-athletic Americans.” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

 

 


The End of the Perfect 10: The Making and Breaking of Gymnastics’ Top Score — From Nadia to Now by Dvora Meyers
796.4409 MEYERS

“Just in time for the 2016 Olympic Games and the fortieth anniversary of Nadia Comaneci’s “Perfect 10,” an exciting and insightful account of the controversial world of gymnastics, the recent changes of the scoring system, and why those changes will drive American gymnasts to the top of the sport in the twenty-first century.” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

 

 


Crazy ’08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History by Cait Murphy
796.357 MURPHY

Crazy ’08 recounts the 1908 season—the year when Peerless Leader Frank Chance’s men went toe to toe to toe with John McGraw and Christy Mathewson’s New York Giants and Honus Wagner’s Pittsburgh Pirates in the greatest pennant race the National League has ever seen. The American League has its own three-cornered pennant fight, and players like Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, and the egregiously crooked Hal Chase ensured that the junior circuit had its moments. But it was the National League’s—and the Cubs’—year. Picaresque and dramatic, 1908 is a season in which so many weird and wonderful things happen that it is somehow unsurprising that a hairpiece, a swarm of gnats, a sudden bout of lumbago, and a disaster down in the mines all play a role in its outcome. And sometimes the events are not so wonderful at all. There are several deaths by baseball, and the shadow of corruption creeps closer to the heart of baseball—the honesty of the game itself. Simply put, 1908 is the year that baseball grew up.” — Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

Happy reading!

—Katie, Adult Reference

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