Read Harder 2017: Read a Book With a Character of Color Going on a Spiritual Journey

 

After a hiatus, we’re back with the last few Read Harder 2017 challenges!  For this week, the challenge is to “Read a book with a character of color going on a spiritual journey,” as submitted by best-selling author Daniel Jose Older.  (Scroll down the list to see one of his YA novels listed!)

The Good Muslim by Tahmima Anam
FICTION ANAM

“From prize-winning Bangladeshi novelist Tahmima Anam, her deeply moving second novel about the rise of Islamic radicalism in Bangladesh seen through the intimate lens of a family.”

 

 

 

 

 


Boxers by Gene Luen Yang
GRAPHIC NOVEL YANG

“In China in 1898 bands of foreign missionaries and soldiers roam the countryside, bullying and robbing Chinese peasants. Little Bao has had enough: harnessing the powers of ancient Chinese gods, he recruits an army of Boxers–commoners trained in kung fu who fight to free China from “foreign devils.”

 

 

 

 

 


The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
FICTION COELHO

“A fable about undauntingly following one’s dreams, listening to one’s heart, and reading life’s omens features dialogue between a boy and an unnamed being.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova
YA FICTION CORDOVA

“Alex is a bruja and the most powerful witch in her family. But she’s hated magic ever since it made her father disappear into thin air. When a curse she performs to rid herself of magic backfires and her family vanishes, she must travel to Los Lagos, a land in-between as dark as Limbo and as strange as Wonderland, to get her family back.”

 

 

 

 

 


Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
FICTION HESSE

“Set in India, Siddhartha is the story of a young Brahmin’s search for ultimate reality after meeting with the Buddha. His quest takes him from a life of decadence to asceticism, through the illusory joys of sensual love with a beautiful courtesan, and of wealth and fame, to the painful struggles with his son and the ultimate wisdom of renunciation.”

 

 

 

 

 


Life of Pi by Yann Martel
FICTION MARTEL

“Pi Patel, having spent an idyllic childhood in Pondicherry, India, as the son of a zookeeper, sets off with his family at the age of sixteen to start anew in Canada, but his life takes a marvelous turn when their ship sinks in the Pacific, leaving him adrift on a raft with a 450-pound Bengal tiger for company.”

 

 

 

 

 


Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older
YA FICTION OLDER

“When the murals painted on the walls of her Brooklyn neighborhood start to change and fade in front of her, Sierra Santiago realizes that something strange is going on–then she discovers her Puerto Rican family are shadowshapers and finds herself in a battle with an evil anthropologist for the lives of her family and friends.”

 

 

 

 

 


A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki
FICTION OZEKI

“In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace–and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox–possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.”

 

 

 

 


Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
GRAPHIC NOVEL SATRAPI

“The great-granddaughter of Iran’s last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists describes growing up in Tehran in a country plagued by political upheaval and vast contraditions between public and private life.”

 

 

 

 

 


The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X
B X

“In the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement to veteran writer and journalist Alex Haley. The Autobiography of Malcolm X defines American culture and the African American struggle for social and economic equality that has now become a battle for survival. Malcolm’s fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens the opportunity to dream, gives extraordinary insight into the most urgent issues of our own time.”

 

 

 

 

 

Happy reading!

—Katie, Adult Reference

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